Junichiro tanizaki s some prefer nettles analysis

As a result, they look timorous compared to the Western women. The idea that Ohisa represents the East is consummated in the closing lines of Chapter Ten: Japanese Literature of the Modern Era.

Irrationality of love coupled with uncouth Junichiro tanizaki s some prefer nettles analysis and social uselessness deepens the sensibilities of love and lust encircling the predicament of chastity.

Were the white powder she practically bathes herself in removed, though, Louise would be revealed as Eurasian, half- Koreanhalf- Russianas close to the East as Kaname himself, in spite of her directness and blatant sexual nature that together form the now gossamer connection between her and the West.

Some have argued that Tanizaki's relation to cinema is important to understanding his overall career. But these are only the framing performances, as the life being led by Kaname and Misako is itself, as Tanizaki reminds us several times, a performance; even their son, Hiroshi, becomes a performer.

The same goes for Louise, the prostitute in Chapter Thirteen, who is a dubious at best representation of the West. Inhe relocated from Odawarawhere he had been living sinceto Yokohamawhich had a large expatriate population, living briefly in a Western-style house and leading a decidedly bohemian lifestyle.

There is also a theme, touched on several times, of regional variation in Japanese culture: Takanatsu can hardly believe how long the two of them procrastinate deciding what to do and when to do it, and urges the couple to tell Hiroshi what is going on.

Tanizaki cautiously cultivates the ascending nature of sexuality through vivid subtleties of eroticisms.

Some Prefer Nettles

So, if you want a cerebral book about Japan, go for it, otherwise go read something else…like Naomi. Fantasy vs Reality[ edit ] Kaname has an overly active fantasy life that he seemingly prefers to interact with more than he does reality.

The loss of Tokyo's historic buildings and neighborhoods in the quake triggered a change in his enthusiasms, as he redirected his youthful love for the imagined West and modernity into a renewed interest in Japanese aesthetics and culture, particularly the culture of the Kansai region around the cities of OsakaKobe and Kyoto.

The novel also introduces a new theme, of sexuality in old age, which reappears in later works such as Kagi The KeyKaname prefers extremes, which will become more and more apparent as the novel progresses.

Jun'ichirō Tanizaki Tanizaki, Jun'ichirō - Essay

In this story, a former servant devotes his life to the care of a blind and disfigured woman who refuses to return his love because of his lower social standing. There is also a theme, touched on several times, of regional variation in Japanese culture: Kaname has long lost interest in Misako and has not slept with her in about…three years.

And the "old man" he is fifty-six or fifty-seven has a deep interest in many forms of traditional Japanese performance, from samisen and song to rustic puppets. In one of his last novels, Futen Rojin Nikki Diary of a Mad Old Man, —the aged diarist is struck down by a stroke brought on by an excess of sexual excitement.

Were the white powder she practically bathes herself in removed, though, Louise would be revealed as Eurasian, half- Koreanhalf- Russianas close to the East as Kaname himself, in spite of her directness and blatant sexual nature that together form the now gossamer connection between her and the West.

Jun'ichirō Tanizaki

In the story, a tattoo artist inscribes a giant spider on the body of a beautiful young woman. The beginning of the novel presents a Kaname whose aesthetic tastes lean more toward the so-called West.

The prose is interesting. We are told in the introduction that the author is a stylist who aims at a dreamy, floating prose, suspicious of too vivid a choice of words, too clear a view, too conspicuous a transition from one figure or idea to another.

Some Prefer Nettles

But there is no East, and there is no West — a concept that becomes more apparent as certain tokens or representations of each begin to arise.

The faint shades of addiction to Naomi, leisurely climb the monochromatic ladder of obsession for Western culture and to rectify personal shortcomings by moulding oneself through the physicality of a new adored maturing body overpowered by behavioural prism. The concept of sexual perversion intimately associates with sexual emancipation with vulgarity taking a high stand in the delusion of the Western vices.

His romanticized version of it is manifested in the western wing of his house in particular, the veranda under which he likes to sithis fascination with American movie starsand very potently in an English translation of the Arabian Nights that he is wont to skim through in order to find the more lewd passages for which it is famous.

His first work, a one-act stage play, was published in a literary magazine that he had helped found. As the book opens, Kaname gently pressures his wife, Misako, into meeting her father and his mistress at a bunraku performance.

Completion of the tattoo signals her symbolic conversion to femme fatale, and the artist submissively becomes her first victim. What he looks for in a woman oscillates between the two, and the fact that his wife is neither one nor the other, but a mix of both, is largely the impetus behind his waning, if not dead, interest in her.

Kaname prefers extremes, which will become more and more apparent as the novel progresses. Is he the illustrious Humbert to the seditious Lolita?. Every worm to his taste; some prefer to eat nettles.

Happy New Year! So, right after I finished Murakami’s book, I thought I would read some more Japanese literature, which led me to Junichiro Tanizaki.

Some Prefer Nettles Summary & Study Guide

Some Prefer Nettles is the fourth work by Junichiro Tanizaki that I have read. (It was first published in in serial fashion in a literary publication. The version I read was translated from Japanese by Edward Seidensticker in )/5. Junichiro Tanizaki's "Some Prefer Nettles" is the story of the slow and painful dissolution of a marriage.

For much of the story, both Kaname and Misako are paralyzed, each unhappy and wanting the other to take the steps necessary for a divorce/5. Feb 01,  · Some Prefer Nettles by Jun'ichiro Tanizaki,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide/5(K). Some Prefer Nettles 蓼 The novel is often regarded as the most autobiographical of Tanizaki's works and one of his finest novels.

The Japanese title of the novel is literally water pepper-eating bugs, and is the first half of the Japanese saying tade kuu mushi mo sukizuki First published: The novel, Some Prefer Nettles, by Junichiro Tanizaki, depicts the story of a troubled couple living in the Taisho period of Japan.

The husband, Kaname, and the wife, Misako, are both frustrated with their unhappy marriage, struggling over the decision of divorce while keeping it a secret from everyone but Kaname’s cousin, Takanatsu.

Junichiro tanizaki s some prefer nettles analysis
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Some Prefer Nettles - Junʼichirō Tanizaki - Google Books